The publications listed here represent a small selection of the work of GCILS staff members. To see full listings of publications please click through to the University of Glasgow main webpages in each individual staff member profile.

Incorporating International Human Rights: The protection of Care Experienced People’s Rights in the Scottish Human Rights Bill

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The Human Rights Consortium Scotland commissioned this report in partnership with Who Cares? Scotland to explore the potential impact of the proposed Scottish Human Rights Bill for protecting the rights of Care Experienced people. The report focuses on the domestic and international law dimensions of this question, in order to understand how best to integrate Care Experienced people into the Bill as proposed. The report has three sections: • First, the report begins with an outline of the SHRB as it appears in the Consultation, identifying how it will change the actions of public authorities in Scotland and place human rights at the centre of decision-making and government. • Second, it considers evidence of the specific needs of Care Experienced people and the potential for the SHRB to better support the realisation of their human rights. • Finally, the report offers an analysis of four ways in which Care Experienced people could be offered specific protection under the SHRB. Care Experienced people, like many people who face disadvantage in Scotland, stand to benefit from the introduction of economic, social, and cultural rights into Scots law. Yet Care Experienced people also face specific forms of discrimination and embedded inequality which require particular consideration and targeted intervention. While recognition in guidance, international law, and outcome monitoring would go some way towards this goal, this report shows that the most secure way to ensure Care Experienced people’s rights are protected is to recognise them in the text of the Bill. To do so would be consistent with the Scottish Government’s wider efforts to keep its promise to Care Experienced people and make a real difference to the effective protection of their rights.

The identity work of journalists and humanitarians in South Sudan’s Protection of Civilians sites

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This article interrogates the simplistic juxtaposition of protectors and protected in South Sudan’s Protection of Civilians (PoC) sites, by asking: who was civilian in South Sudan, and how were civilians being protected? We present a civilian landscape that is much broader and more complex than the dominant PoC imaginary. Drawing attention to civilians who engage in professional tasks, the article considers the everyday practices of humanitarians and journalists. This illustrates that the category of ‘civilian’ is not the bureaucratic or legal certainty suggested by international law or PoC discourse, but unstable, shifting and constructed through everyday practice.

Richard Stupart

Consultation Response for A Human Rights Bill for Scotland

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A Dataset of References to Youth in Peace Agreements (YPAD), 1990-2022

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The dataset (YPAD) compiles 208 peace agreements which were concluded in the period of 1990-2022 and make an express textual reference to youth, young people, and similar. These represent approximately 12% of all peace agreements concluded in this period. The agreements in YPAD address inter-state, intra-state, or local level armed conflicts, relating to 70 peace processes from across the world. YPAD offers a thematic categorisation of the references to youth in peace agreements under eight main themes and 53 sub-themes. (2023-07-27)

Daniel Odin Shaw

References to Youth in Peace Agreements, 1990-2022: Introducing a new dataset

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The aim of this report is to introduce the novel Dataset of References to Youth in Peace Agreements, 1990-2022 (YPAD). YPAD contains 208 peace agreements that refer to youth, young people, or similar, concluded between the years of 1990-2022 to bring an end to conflicts of inter-state, intra-state, or local nature. The dataset codes references to youth in peace agreements according to eight main themes and 53 sub-themes, in addition to including information on the respective agreement, conflict, and peace process, among others. The report explores the characteristics of peace agreements that refer to youth and offers a thematic analysis of the references to youth in the texts of these agreements.

Daniel Odin Shaw

History as deconstruction, history as reconstruction: time and structure in critical international law

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