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Dr Jessica Schechinger

Lecturer in International Law

Dr Jessica N.M. Schechinger is a Lecturer in International Law at the University of Glasgow School of Law/GCILS. She is also a co-convenor of the European Society of International Law (ESIL) Interest Group on the Law of the Sea (since 2018, re-elected in 2022), and a member of the International Law Association (ILA) Committee on Protection of People at Sea (since 2023).

Jessica obtained her PhD from the University of Glasgow (sponsored by a full College of Social Science Scholarship), and holds an LLB and an LLM (Public International Law), both from Utrecht University, the Netherlands. She also graduated from the Rhodes Academy of Oceans Law and Policy.

She previously worked at the University of Glasgow, the University of Amsterdam, and Utrecht University/the Netherlands Institute for the Law of the Sea (NILOS).

Jessica teaches on a variety of international law courses on the LLB and the LLM programmes. Her main expertise and research interests are in the areas of general international law, international law of the sea, and international human rights law. Her more recent work has focussed on maritime security challenges, human rights at sea, and how human rights law applies at sea, especially in the context of Privately Contracted Armed Security Personnel (PCASP) operating at sea. Her written evidence for the UK House of Lords, International Relations and Defence Committee inquiry, ‘UNCLOS: fit for purpose in the 21st century?’, was quoted and referred to several times in the Committee’s 2022 Report UNCLOS: the law of the sea in the 21st century.

Currently, she is mostly working on issues of maritime security (including environmental and maritime security issues in the Arctic/High North); human rights at sea (as part of her forthcoming monograph on the regulation of PCASP operating at sea, and being a member of the ILA Committee on Protection of People at Sea); maritime piracy; international environmental law; international and shared responsibility; and United Nations law.

Below is a list of key publications. For a full list please click on the following links:

University of Glasgow Profile

0000-0001-9729-6773

Publications

UNCLOS: fit for purpose in the 21st century?

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Written evidence (UNC0043), House of Lords, International Relations and Defence Committee inquiry

The Nave Andromeda and the seven stowaways

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An Incident of “Piracy” off the Coast of Suriname? The Definition of Piracy and the Use (and Misuse) of International Law Terminology

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According to media coverage, a ‘pirate attack’ took place off the coast of Suriname in April 2018. This submission assesses whether the violent incident meets the definition of piracy under international law, reviews different (legal) definitions, and highlights the importance of the location of the attack. It is argued that the use of the term ‘piracy’ and related terminology should have been avoided, as the incident seemingly occurred within Suriname’s territorial sea.

Geneva Declaration on Human Rights at Sea (Version 1, 5 April 2019) – a contribution to the discussion on human rights in the maritime context

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The Practice of Shared Responsibility in International Law

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This is the third book in the series Shared Responsibility in International Law, which examines the problem of distribution of responsibilities among multiple states and other actors. In its work on the responsibility of states and international organisations, the International Law Commission recognised that attribution of acts to one actor does not exclude possible attribution of the same act to another state or organisation. Recognising that the applicable rules and procedures for shared responsibility may differ between particular issue areas, this volume reviews the practice of states, international organisations, courts and other bodies that have dealt with the issue of international responsibility of multiple wrongdoing actors in a wide range of issue areas, including energy, extradition, investment law, NATO-led operations and fisheries. These analyses jointly assess the fit of the prevailing principles of international responsibility and provide a basis for reform and further development of international law.

André Nollkaemper
Ilias Plakokefalos

Distribution of Responsibilities in International Law

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This is the second book in the series Shared Responsibility in International Law, which examines the problem of distribution of responsibilities among multiple states and other actors. In its work on the responsibility of states and international organisations, the International Law Commission recognised that attribution of acts to one actor does not exclude possible attribution of the same act to another state or organisation. However, it provided limited guidance for the often complex question of how responsibility is to be distributed among wrongdoing actors. This study fills that gap by shedding light on principles of distribution from extra-legal perspectives. Drawing on disciplines such as political theory, moral philosophy, and economics, this volume enquires into the bases and justifications for apportionment of responsibilities that can support a critique of current international law, offers insight into the justification of alternative interpretations, and provides inspiration for reform and further development of international law.

André Nollkaemper
Dov Jacobs