Author Image

Professor Christian J Tams

Director of the GCILS

* working remotely, please contact me by email

Christian J. Tams is Professor of International Law at the University of Glasgow and GCILS’ founding director. He directs the Erasmus Mundus Master in International Law of Global Security, Peace and Development (ILGSPD) and the Glasgow-Leuphana dual degree programme in international economic law.
Christian is an expert in public international law, with special expertise in the law of treaties, State responsibility, dispute settlement and investment law. He studied law at the universities of Kiel, Lyon III, and Cambridge (LLM, 2000; PhD, 2004), and is a qualified German lawyer (admitted in 2005). Before joining the School of Law he was an assistant professor at the Walther Schücking Institute of International Law at the University of Kiel.
Christian is an elected member of the Board of the European Society of International Law and of the Council of the German Society of International Law. He is the review editor of the European Journal of International Law and one of the editors of the European Yearbook if International Economic Law.
Over the past years, Christian has held visiting positions at universities in France, China, Japan, and Austria. In 2018, he directed the Centre of Research and Studies at The Hague Academy of International Law.
An academic member of Matrix Chambers London, Christian regularly advises States, individuals and companies in international disputes. In recent years, he has acted in proceedings before the International Court of Justice, the Iran-US Claims Tribunal and arbitral tribunals, and provided expert advice in domestic proceedings bearing on international law.

Publications

The ILC Articles at 20

Read more about this publication

“The Articles on the Responsibility of States for Internationally Wrongful Acts (Articles), developed by the International Law Commission (ILC), turn 20 this year. On 9 August 2001 – 45 years after the first report by Special Rapporteur Francisco García-Amador on the topic, after 5 Special Rapporteurs and 34 reports by them – the ILC adopted the final text of the Articles, thus bringing to an end work that (in the words of Rosalyn Higgins) were it not for the Commission’s broad understanding of responsibility, ‘should on the face of it [have] take[n] one summer’s work’.3 On 12 December 2001, the UN General Assembly ‘noted’ the Articles and commended them to the attention of Governments in December.4 Since then, reflected in successive reports compiled by the UN Secretary-General, the Articles have become the obvious reference point for debates about State responsibility: they are invoked, applied, cited, criticised, studied by nearly everyone working in or with international law, from undergraduate students to investment tribunals, and even domestic courts.5 They reflect international law’s everyday, routine, application: mostly unspectacular, sometimes pedestrian; dramatic only rarely. What is more, most readers, users, students, critics have been quick to adopt the ILC’s jargon and categories.”

GCILS Working Paper Series

Federica Paddeu

Experiments Great and Small: Centenary Reflections on the League of Nations

Read more about this publication

” Given the abundance of existing League scholarship, the aims of the present contribution cannot but be modest. What it offers is a series of sketches of the League, as seen from the distance of a centenary. These sketches approach their object from two perspectives: three of them provide a highly condensed account of the League’s life (section II); two others draw out some of its legacies (section III). Needless to say, the engagement is selective, the treatment unfinished. But the sketches hopefully capture essential aspects of the League and draw the readers’ eye to features that are worth remembering a century later. ” https://www.duncker-humblot.de/zeitschrift/german-yearbook-of-international-law-gyil-22/?page_id=0&jaids=2019&page=1&type=titel#titlelist

GCILS Working Paper Series

International Courts and Tribunals and Violent Conflict

Read more about this publication

“This chapter examines international adjudication and arbitration, assessing the diverse roles of international courts and tribunals (ICaTs) in relation to violent conflicts. It shows that, over time, ICaTs have come to render decision upon decision, but – contrary to the expectations of early arbitration movements – hardly ever prevent ‘wars between nations’. Their mandates have been expanded, but typically only cover aspects of violent conflicts. While such aspects are today increasingly submitted to arbitration or adjudication, ‘conflict litigation’ remains controversial and challenges the authority of ICaTs. As the chapter demonstrates, the significance of arbitration and adjudication over questions of violent conflict has varied over time and forms part of the general history of international dispute resolution. Having surveyed this general history, the chapter sketches out the evolving legal framework governing courts and conflicts. It discusses which aspects of violent conflicts are addressed by ICaTs under contemporary international law and highlights current challenges of ‘conflict litigation’.”

GCILS Working Papers

‘League of Nations’

Read more about this publication

World War I to World War II Published under the auspices of the Max Planck Foundation for International Peace and the Rule of Law under the direction of Rüdiger Wolfrum.

in R. Wolfrum (ed) Max Planck Encyclopaedia of Public International Law (OUP, 2006)

The Role of Treaties in Pursuing the Objectives of the UN Charter: The Text and the Practice

Read more about this publication

The United Nations is a vital part of the international order. Yet this book argues that the greatest contribution of the UN is not what it has achieved (improvements in health and economic development, for example) or avoided (global war, say, or the use of weapons of mass destruction). It is, instead, the process through which the UN has transformed the structure of international law to expand the range and depth of subjects covered by treaties. This handbook offers the first sustained analysis of the UN as a forum in which and an institution through which treaties are negotiated and implemented. Chapters are written by authors from different fields, including academics and practitioners; lawyers and specialists from other social sciences (international relations, history, and science); professionals with an established reputation in the field; younger researchers and diplomats involved in the negotiation of multilateral treaties; and scholars with a broader view on the issues involved. The volume thus provides unique insights into UN treaty-making. Through the thematic and technical parts, it also offers a lens through which to view challenges lying ahead and the possibilities and limitations of this understudied aspect of international law and relations.

In: Chesterman, S., Malone, D. M. and Villalpando, S. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook on United Nations Treaties

9780190947842

The International Community

Read more about this publication

Concepts allow us to know, understand, think, do and change international law. This book, with sixty chapters by leading scholars, provides a nuanced guide to those concepts of historical significance for international law, as well as those that have become central to how we think about the discipline. In select cases this book also offers some new concepts, seeking to address familiar concerns that have not been fully articulated within the discipline. This unique book is the first expansive exploration of concepts that have become historically central to the discipline. It allows us to appreciate how order, struggle and change play out in international law and legal thought, and how these concerns of power implicate ethical considerations. Embracing a wide range of historical and theoretical approaches, this book hopes to ignite a renewed, fertile engagement between our concepts and the contemporary, precarious, conditions of international legal life. Thought-provoking, original and engaging, this book is essential reading for researchers, postgraduates and doctoral students in international law, legal history and legal theory. Academics in international relations, history, sociology and political thought will also find this an essential read.

In: D'Aspremont, J. and Singh, S. (eds.) Concepts for International Law: Contributions to Disciplinary Thought.

978 1 78347 467 7