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Dr Charlie Peevers

Senior Lecturer in International Law

Charlie Peevers is Senior Lecturer in International Law. Her research interests encompass the history and theory of international law, with particular focus on military intervention, disasters, and large-scale engineering projects. In 2015/16 she was a Visiting Fellow at the Program on Science, Technology and Society at Harvard Kennedy School where she began work on a book project on the Suez and Panama Canals in international legal history.

Charlie is an Associate Member of the Institute for International Law & the Humanities, Melbourne Law School and an Honorary Fellow of UTS. She has taught at several institutions including LSE, King’s College, London, UTS and is Faculty of the Institute for Global Law & Policy Workshops, Harvard Law School. She has been recognized with awards for teaching excellence and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Charlie was formerly a practising barrister (Middle Temple, called 2009) and continues to engage in consultancy work in human rights and public international law.

Below is a list of key publications. For a full list please click on the following links:

University of Glasgow Profile

0000-0001-9740-421X

Publications

The Politics of Justifying Force: the Suez Crisis, the Iraq War, and International Law

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What are the politics involved in a government justifying its use of military force abroad? What is the role of international law in that discourse? How and why is international law crucial to this process? And what role does the media have in mediating the interaction of international law and politics? This book provides a fresh and engaging answer to these questions. It introduces different actors to the study of international law in this context, in particular highlighting the importance of institutional actors and the role of the media. It takes a theoretical approach, informed by detailed empirical analysis of key case studies, which challenges the traditional distinction between the spheres of 'the international' and 'the domestic' in global affairs, and the role of international law in the making of public policy.